The Water Station

Cast members of The Water Station stand around the pile of junk looking out during a run Feb. 20 at Strother Theatre.

Cast members of The Water Station stand around the pile of junk looking out during a run Feb. 20 at Strother Theatre.

I have a deep appreciation for theatre.  I enjoy shooting the shows at Ball State and it’s truly been in adventure. I got to experience The Water Station directed by Drew Vidal at Ball State in Strother Theatre.  The show was based on sixteen travelers who discover the water station and how they interact with it and with each other.

Meghan Conley plays with a parasol during a run of The Water Station. Actors communicated using only facial expressions and body language.

Meghan Conley plays with a parasol during a run of The Water Station. Actors communicated using only facial expressions and body language.

It was the first time I had ever seen a show without dialogue, and the first time I had ever watched a show with a slow tempo.  The show was performed in slow motion. I think it is safe to say that the first characters entrance took about five minutes just to get to center stage in a black box theatre in the round.

I am not normally a patient person. Regardless, I was fascinated by the concept. I became hyper aware of the way I live my life in such a hurry. Everything around me is always moving so quickly. I also became very aware of the talent it takes for an actor to have the patience for a show like this. I’m really proud of the entire cast. I know that my struggles as an actor certainly include physicality; I can’t stand the thought of having no dialogue to lean on.

When I walked in, I was very surprised to see a mound of junk against the entire back wall of the theatre.  The haze was very thick even before the rehearsal started.  I got a sort of post-apocalyptic vibe from the set.  Opposite the mound o

f junk, a broken water spout dripped at the same speed throughout the show. The monotony was only broken when the characters interacted with the water, giving the audience a break from the sound.

The fun thing about shooting this particular show is that I used a 50 mm lens that I don’t use very often. It’s not a lens that I’m comfortable using when the actors are up onstage, but it was fantastic to use when the actors were no more than ten feet from me at any given time. The lens doesn’t zoom so I had to rely on moving around and paying attention to get decent shots. I feel like I accomplished this without distracting the actors or upsetting the stage manager. Happy stage managers are always a plus.

The photos came out really well and I’ve decided to share then with you! It’s really fun to experiment with my different lenses and use them in situations I wouldn’t think to normally. I’m learning and improving everyday and it’s an amazing journey.

Dee Jordan carries a large pack on his back as he searches for something in the pile of things during a run of The Water Station in Strother Theatre Feb. 20.

Dee Jordan carries a large pack on his back as he searches for something in the pile of things during a run of The Water Station in Strother Theatre Feb. 20.

Demani Arnold lets the water fall into his hands while exploring the water station.

Demani Arnold lets the water fall into his hands while exploring the water station.

Katie Stofko fills a glass bottle during a run The Water Station.

Katie Stofko fills a glass bottle during a run The Water Station.

Evan Cullman, left, and Demani Arnold, right, look out. The script is communicated only through facial expression and body language.

Evan Cullman, left, and Demani Arnold, right, look out. The script is communicated only through facial expression and body language.

Katie Stofko unfolds a sheet as Nic Eastlund looks on. Behind them sits Cole Abell.

Katie Stofko unfolds a sheet as Nic Eastlund looks on. Behind them sits Cole Abell.

Brandon Merriweather catches Jessica Ervin as she leans backward upon being frightened during a run of The Water Station.

Brandon Merriweather catches Jessica Ervin as she leans backward upon being frightened during a run of The Water Station.

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